Practice Aloha

Recently, I was listening to an audio recording of Dr. Wayne Dyer giving a talk at the I CAN DO IT! Tampa Conference (Nov 2010)- I will be attending the I CAN DO IT! Vancouver Conference in March (Happy-New-Year-to-me!). During the talk he said that by his door he has a sign. He looks at this sign every time he leaves his home. It reads “Practice Aloha”. For Dr. Dyer, this sign reminds him to slow down. Take the time to listen, pause, greet someone, and feel connected to the present moment. I really loved this saying as I am always finding ways to slow down (mentally and physically). This saying “Practice Aloha” has been in my thoughts all week as I return to work after a fabulous, relaxing holiday and I have to remind myself throughout the day to stop and “practice Aloha”. (For the record I am not stopping people on the streets of Victoria saying “ALOHA”).

I decided to do a little research on what the meaning of Aloha is and if in fact it is as Dr. Dyer suggests the thoughtfulness of the present moment. According to the following site: http://www.huna.org/html/wynalo.html,

The word Aloha means much more than words could ever express, and certainly much more than “hello” and “goodbye” or “love.” Aloha is a concept that is all encompassing as a way of being in the presence of Spirit.

Aloha is used as a greeting and parting because it is also said to mean…”love surrounds us,” or “may love be with you,” to present an atmosphere of friendly acceptance and blessings.

Living Aloha is a way of life that all the great masters have taught us in their own language throughout time. The problem is that we have all been trained to respond to things as warriors and not with Aloha . “The world is a dangerous place,” is the root belief of the warrior. “The world is a loving place” is the belief in Aloha .

“The Way of Aloha” is a path that emphasizes acceptance, forgiveness and cooperation through the development of hyper-awareness, the cultivation of Mana –inner power, friendship and unity, the practice of survival/exploring skills, and an ethic of “love and be loved.”

Although the definition of Aloha does not directly state “to slow down”, you can see its meaning throughout its definition. To be accepting, to practice forgiveness, to be cooperative these acts and ways of being require us to slow down, to be thoughtful in our decisions and the way we express ourselves.

Here’s hoping that I can “Practice Aloha” regularly and try to tame my wild and frantic mind!

Aloha to you!

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